Knights of Columbus Council 3340 Dr. Earl C. Bach 

Historian’s Corner: 
​Who was Dr. Earl C. Bach?

BORN MAY 13, 1916—DIED JULY 2, 1964


Who was Dr. Earl C. Bach?
Earl C. Bach was born May 13, 1916 in Milwaukee Wisconsin. He graduated with an A. B. degree from Marquette University in Milwaukee in 1937 and received his M. A. degree there in 1938. He taught speech and drama at Messmer High School in Milwaukee, and then at Cathedral High School and at St. Thomas Seminary in Denver. From 1941 to 1943, he was speech and drama instructor at Marquette University. He married the former Lorraine O’Meara on December 27, 1948 in Denver. They had four children, Thomas Allen, Judith Anne, John Charles and Mary Christine.In 1950, Earl C. Bach received his doctorate degree from the University of Denver for his thesis on the status of dramatic education in Catholic colleges and universities in the United States. Dr. Bach transferred from Denver Council 539 to St. Mary's Council 3340 in 1953. The highest office that he had held in Council 539 was deputy grand knight. When his form 100 was read, the council members were, of course, pleased with the addition but not really impressed by the name or the background of the transferee. Brother Earl's appearance at his first meeting at Council 3340 changed that and they all knew that Council 539's loss was our gain.Brother Earl was elected State Treasurer at the Knights of Columbus state convention in Trinidad in 1954. He progressed through the state chairs and was elected State Deputy in 1959.Upon completion of his term as State Deputy, brother Earl was elected Grand Knight of Council 3340. He had never been a Grand Knight. His term as Grand Knight was outstanding with his focus on membership and he personally led the council's membership drive. This resulted in Council 3340 achieving the Century Club Award - 100 members in one year. Never before had this been accomplished in the state of Colorado. Later in the year, Council 539 achieved this Award –but Council 3340 was first. Brother Bach was elected to a second term as Grand Knight and he was determined to repeat the century club award. He and the K of C insurance representative and some other knights went to Mass at St. Louis preparing to go out and sign up 100 men into the order.It was not to be – Brother Earl went home to breakfast intending to meet everyone later in the day but suf-fered a fatal heart attack and our grand knight was taken from us.
A truly great man!

Venerable Michael J. McGivney

Founder, Knights of Columbus

“The real question today is not when human life begins, but, what is the value of human life? The abortionist can hardly doubt whether it is a human being. 

The real question for him and for all of us is that tiny human life has a God-given right to be protected by the law— the same right we have. and we must protect that l;ife”
Ronald Reagan

"Let us not seek the Republican answer or the Democratic answer, but the right answer."

John F. Kennedy

Knights of Columbus  Values...

  • Family comes first. 
  • Integrity matters.
  • Justice should prevail. 
  • Service above self. 
  • Honesty is a given. 
  • Humility is a gift.

"The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy."

Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Late-19th century Connecticut was marked by the growing prevalence of fraternal benefit societies, hostility toward Catholic immigrants and dangerous working conditions in factories that left many families fatherless. Recognizing a vital, practical need in his community, Father Michael J. McGivney, the 29-year-old assistant pastor of St. Mary’s Church in New Haven, Conn., gathered a group of men at his parish on Oct. 2, 1881. He proposed establishing a lay organization, the goal of which would be to prevent Catholic men from entering secret societies whose membership was antithetical to Church teaching, to unite men of Catholic faith and to provide for the families of deceased members.

As a symbol that allegiance to their country did not conflict with allegiance to their faith, the organization’s members took as their patron Christopher Columbus — recognized as a Catholic and celebrated as the discoverer of America. Thanks to Father McGivney’s persistence, the Knights of Columbus elected officers in February 1882 and officially assumed corporate status on March 29.

In addition to the Order’s stated benefits, Catholic men were drawn to the Knights because of its emphasis on serving one’s Church, community and family with virtue. Writing in The Columbiad in 1898, a year before he was elected supreme knight, Edward L. Hearn wrote that a Knight should live according to the virtues of loyalty, charity, courtesy and modesty, as well as “self-denial and careful respect for the feelings of others.” Fraternity and patriotism were added to the Knights’ founding principles of charity and unity in 1885 and 1900, respectively.